News from SGC

Posted on Wednesday 28th of September 2011
The international Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC) today announced $48.9 million in new funding has been attained
Posted on Wednesday 28th of September 2011
"Sleeping sickness", also known as human African trypanosomiasis, is responsible for approximately 30,000 deaths each year and 70 million people are at risk of infection, as estimated by the World Health Organization
Posted on Wednesday 28th of September 2011
Functional and localization experiments in mammalian cells have demonstrated that Mps1 is essential for the fidelity of the cell cycle and genomic stability.
Posted on Wednesday 28th of September 2011
Apicomplexan parasites are a diverse group of protozoan parasites, several of which cause important human and animal diseases, such as malaria, cryptosporidiosis and toxoplasmosis
Posted on Wednesday 28th of September 2011
SGC Oxford - Toxoplasmosis is a parasitic disease caused by the apicomplexan protozoa Toxoplasma gondii and can pose a significant threat to immunocompromised individuals, e.g. those undergoing organ transplantation or chemotherapy and HIV/AIDS patients, who cannot fight back the infection and are thus dependent on drugs to control the infection.
Posted on Wednesday 28th of September 2011
The Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC) and Pfizer today announced that Pfizer will join the SGC-led public-private collaboration to generate small molecule inhibitors – "chemical probes" – for proteins involved in epigenetic signaling. Pfizer and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) are now members of this collaboration, launched in late 2008 with the aim to provide the community with high quality research reagents, free from restriction on use.
Posted on Wednesday 28th of September 2011

The SGC has been awarded more than 0.5 M Euro as part of a joint EU FP7 -Health grant: 'Protein Binders for Characterisation of Human Proteome Function: Generation, Validation, Application "Affinomics", which encompasses 15 participant labs in eight different European countries for 5 years.

The Affinomics programme aims to leverage existing efforts in Europe to generate large-scale resources of validated protein-binding molecules ('binders') as affinity reagents for characterisation of the human proteome. These binders will be applied in comprehensive structural and functional analyses of protein expression, interactions and complexes.

Posted on Wednesday 28th of September 2011
Two influential journals are now accepting and publishing articles that are enhanced using a unique platform known as iSee (interactive Structurally enhanced experience), developed in a collaboration between the SGC's Dr. Brian Marsden and Dr. Wen Hwa Lee, with Prof. Ruben Abagyan and his team from MolSoft L.L.C. This platform, featuring animations that 'fly' the reader through the structural representation to the specific molecular feature being described, has already been successfully employed in a pioneering PLoS ONE Collection highlighting a number of protein structures from the SGC.
Posted on Wednesday 28th of September 2011

The Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC), an international public-private partnership that aims to determine three dimensional structures of medically important proteins, announced today the release into the public domain of its 1000th high resolution protein structure.

Posted on Wednesday 28th of September 2011
A research team led by scientists from Oxford University (including the Structural Genomics Consortium, the Botnar Research Centre, the Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, the Wellcome Building for Molecular Physiology, and the australian Diamantina Institute in Brisbane), have successfully deciphered the molecular mechanism how an ER protease (ERAP1) functions in a key step in cellular immunity- the processing of peptide antigens that are presented to Major Histocompatibilty Complex 1 (MHC1) molecules.

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